Monday, May 7, 2012

It’s a girl!

The blooms are just starting open on this Echium, one half of the pair bought as Echium x wildpretii 'Rocket' which was later identified as Echium pininana.
Since they’re pink I believe that means it is indeed E. x wildpretii 'Rocket' because if it was an E. pininana they would be opening blue.
I realize the pink vs. blue issue wasn't keeping anyone awake at night, but I can get obsessed with the details sometimes.
More photos from Echium Watch 2012, this one is now over 8ft tall:
The buds along the trunk are growing their own stems…
The straight Echium wildpretti has grown to about 4ft tall…
Its buds are growing in a swirl up the main stalk.
And the tiny leaves on the tip continue the pattern.

32 comments:

  1. Congrats, Echium Mom - just in time for Mother's Day! Echiums are such beautifully statuesque plants. I remember the first Echium I saw, years ago, in the front garden of my neighbor Deborah (yes, that Deborah, of Cistus Nursery). I couldn't believe the bloom spike and I guess it might have been Echium pininana, because the florets were this amazing, intense deep blue. Gorgeous!

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    1. Ha! I wasn't even thinking about Mother's Day when I thought of the title of the post, great tie in Jane.

      I had an Echium pininana bloom last year and it was intense, I'm hoping the pink is as beautiful once they are all open.

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  2. You have a beautiful baby there! Can we grow this?

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    1. While I can't say for sure I think that since they are very "at home" in the Bay Area it might be too hot for them in your part of the country.

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  3. Congratulations!

    Beautiful flowers and stunning spikiness. A great composition with the Y. rostrata too.

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    1. I can't believe how a little 6" plant has grown to dwarf the Y. rostrata!

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  4. Looking forward to seeing this in full flower!

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    1. With the heat in our forecast I;m thinking that might just be a Bloomday reality!

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  5. Those are stunning!! You have me convinced to purchase an echium this year! I want one of those massive blooms in the yard!

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    1. Yay! I hope it overwinters for you.

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  6. Replies
    1. Me too! (of the places where they can grow these with no worries)

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  7. 8' tall! That's stupendous...and I love how even the stems are flushed with red...these are SO worth the wait!

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    1. It's odd that only one stem has that red coloring, while the other plant does not. Of course the fact that it's three times it's size is interesting too.

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  8. Lucky you ,will it self -seed ? I bought another "pride of madera'

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    1. It might. If I end up with lots of Echium babies you know I'll share!

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  9. dude. happy mothers day! celebratory cocktails?

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  10. Replies
    1. Statuesque is a perfect descriptor.

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  11. I think Teza mentioned Rocket today. Now I know what he meant...this looks quite intimidating from afar, up close it's all soft and fuzzy.

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    1. The fuzz it a little prickly, it can't be all nice stuff round here you know.

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  12. How exciting! I was just looking at my 'BOY' and wondering when he is going to bloom???
    ...any day now!!!

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    1. I hope you'll post a few pictures.

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  13. Great echium! I think mine would be much bigger but I didn't put it in the ground or in a big enough pot. I am afraid it will freeze during our winters. What to do, what to do?

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  14. I can't wait to see how these develop. I just put my little wildpretii seedlings in the ground.

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  15. We grew echiums from seed when we lived on Vashon Island. We started with nine seeds, all of which germinated. The first winter, we built a shelter over them and strung up some Christmas lights. They survived. The second winter, they got snowed on repeatedly (which is stunning, by the way), and they just got bigger. They finally bloomed the third year in a spectacular display. The next spring, there were thousands of seedlings.

    There are two photos of these plants in my Facebook photo album: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.100331276649856.590.100000189515795&type=3&l=b07626841d

    Prepare for daily hummingbird battles and heavy bee activity!

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