Thursday, February 26, 2015

From the streets of the East Bay...

They'll make an interesting couple, don't you think?

So this is it, my final post from our September trip to the Bay Area. It's a collection of things I saw driving, and walking, around the East Bay.

This is so fabulous, I wanted to see what the garden on the other side looked like, but the fence gaps just weren't big enough.

Had to be pretty cool though, right?

Aloe craziness!

I wonder how long it took to get this big? Do they have to prune it?

I can't remember if it was the fence or the burnt out agave spike that caught my eye,

Definitely on the downward spiral.

But look at all the tiny babies!

Some had fallen to the ground, and yes - I picked them up. Wouldn't you?

Just down the street...I believe it's a Xanthorrhoea?

It looks like they do appreciate it.

Wowsa! So much for the front yard!

I'm sure it's a pain in the ass for them, but I couldn't help but think it's fabulous.

That's a skirt!

This was one of my major plant crushes from this trip, Eriobotrya deflexa...

The Bronze Loquat...

In the same hellstrip was this Leptospermum scoparium, which I was gaga over, yes, even the pink.

All in all it was a very good vacation, the Bay Area holds many plant treasures and interesting discoveries. Now I get to focus on writing about our Christmastime trip to San Diego and Los Angeles! So many good things ahead...

All material © 2009-2015 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

35 comments:

  1. Some great finds! I especially love the huge Aloe in photo 5. Aloes that turn into shrubs or trees are just so outside my experience, I get so excited by them!

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    1. Me too, everyone walking by though looked at me like I was crazy when I stopped to take a picture.

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  2. Every exotic seems to be just that extra bigger in Bay Area!

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  3. I like that enormous Yucca. Although it is true that it may be too much for the front yard, hehe.

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    1. But as long as it's in someone else's front yard....

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  4. Aloe, Loree! We're glad to see that you've joined the crowd. Fondly, Craziness.

    How cool to see some of the things we pamper and drag inside for the winter growing happily (!) in the ground. I've really enjoyed your bay area trip!

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    1. Are you perhaps thinking of a trip of your own? You and Tom should take a road trip this June. Sort of a Fling tribute.

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    2. Someday it would be fun. Was just thinking of your Aloe Craziness caption. (Aloe/hello..."Aloe, Craziness," craziness responding with "Aloe, Loree." Welcoming you to the crowd of the insane...

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  5. I see a lot of these things when I drive through Berkeley but I never seem to find time to stop, or there's no space to pull over, etc. I'm glad you did, though! Great random sightings.

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    1. Andrew has gotten so used to my sudden "pull over" statements he doesn't even ask why anymore. "Wow did you see that?" is often answered by "should I go back around?"...he's a good one.

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  6. Truly another world, at least horticulturally. I was most impressed by that front yard yucca, and pain in the ass is right, maybe back, arms, and shoulders too.

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    1. And terribly expensive to get rid off.

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  7. Small yards, big plants. Imagine years ago someone planted a cute little yucca and now it's taking over the block! Nice tour of random scenes.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it Shirley! I enjoyed your tour of the water system in San Antonio. For some reason my iPad wouldn't let me comment on it.

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  8. I can just see you with your nose up against that fence, trying to peek through! That Yucca looks like Y. elephantipes, the same species we removed from our slope - it gives you and idea of just how big they get...

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    1. I was! And yes, that's incredible!

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  9. You need a little folding stepladder so you can see over fences. Sigh...the trunk on that Eribotria!

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    1. I can just see Andrew's face when I start packing a step ladder to take on trips.

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    2. Just bear in mind all the things Grace Kelly pulled out of her little overnight bag in 'Rear Window'.

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  10. You have an eye for picking out the spiky. And yes I have had similar finds in Arizona lying forlornly on the ground. There is always someone who has a home for them!

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    1. My brother and I were walking in Tucson when we discovered a pile of opuntia next to the trash in an alley. He filled up the back of his truck and had a fabulous (and free) start on his Phoenix garden!

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  11. That enormous Aloe is all one plant? Yikes. Now, please get those L.A. posts written and posted before I go down there in May.

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  12. You do have a knack for finding exotic, beautiful, interesting, outlandish plants! I love them all! Thank you for showing them to us.

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  13. That double pink Leptospermum caught my eye, how pretty!! I think I killed that one several years ago :P That Aloe and the house kinda had a bit of an Adams Family feeling about it :) Would have loved to have seen the inside.

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  14. I think it would cost at least 15K to remove that Yucca. No wonder it has been allowed to do its thing. At least they don't have to mow or water it.

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    1. Yikes! While I loved it I certainly can see that living in it's shadow would be a little repressive.

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  15. Wow. Love your random garden posts especially when the plants are that good. That fence would driven me mad obscuring the treats just out of view.

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    1. I even tried that trick where you walk along looking through the cracks and your movement gives you a better idea of what's back there as you pick up tiny pieces of the view. No dice.

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  16. WOW, that yucca! I love these random posts.

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  17. As I scrolled through the photos I just kept saying, "whoa. WHOA." It's crazy what can grow like a weed in California.

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  18. That yard-filling yucca is worth the lot purchase alone...really! Froggy and Raccoon just might have their eyes on it, even if their names suggest more riparian than dry and spiky...

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