Wednesday, October 13, 2021

Rhododendron Species Botanical Garden: visit pt three

We're back—back at the RSBG wandering the pathways and enjoying every minute of it...

I didn't see a tag for this fern, lovely color on the new growth though (maybe Dryopteris erythrosora?)

Rhododendron falconeri ssp. eximium

Pretty hot!

Paeonia mairei

Close-up...


Rhododendron fortunei ssp. fortunei

Because that foliage!

A big patch of podophyllum is always welcome.

I am embarrassed to admit this one seriously stumped me. Even after I saw a tag I still wondered...

Hydrangea integrifolia

Yep.

Next up, that begonia always gets me.

Big leaves (it's not named Begonia grandis for nothing) and it's hardy! But I hear it's late to appear, and I am impatient, and those pink flowers (or worse the white version)... ugh.

Damn. Kick me when I'm down. 

Rhododendron forrestii ssp. forrestii. Dead in my garden. Thanks for the sad reminder.

Look it's a Christmas tree! With rodgersia at it's base. Wouldn't it be fun to sneak in decorations in December?

Blechnum chilense...

Several garden's worth. So dreamy!

This mahonia tree makes me happy every time I see it.

Rhododendron exasperatum (best name!)

Cautleya spicata, I believe.


I'm always in awe of this plant and wish I had a spot for it.

Closed? But I want to go look closer at the goings on over there!

Rhododendron makinoi

 And finally, Rhododendron yuefengense...

There's just one last section of the RSBG that I haven't posted about, and it's the fern stumpery—part four. I'm saving the best for last, coming up next week!

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11 comments:

  1. So many plants I can't even hope to grow. I really miss having ferns but there are few that can survive here and only the western sword fern comes close to thriving (courtesy of heavier watering on my neighbor's side of the fence).

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    1. Heavy watering neighbors provide nice microclimates don't they?

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  2. Even better than yesterday. I grow Paeonia marei and both pink and white versions of that Begonia. Western light going through the foliage is fabulous.

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    1. That begonia is starting to win me over. I just fear that I wouldn't be able to wait for it to appear in the spring and I'd end up putting a shovel through it.

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  3. Looks so beautifully green and lush. What are the big leaves under the mahonia?

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    1. I think those may be Astilboides tabularis.

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  4. Beautiful images! It looks like a great place to visit, for sure. That Begonia grandis has me intrigued. Lovely stuff.

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    1. I'm hoping I can visit in the late spring next year, it should be an entirely different place then!

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  5. This is one garden I never get tire of seeing, in person or through someone else's lens. I've also taken a photo of the tag-less fern: those emerging bronze fronds are amazing.
    Hydrangea integrifolia is worthy of a double-take.

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    1. Is it wrong to say I wish the Hydrangea integrifolia would never bloom? I love those leaves.

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  6. I think that fern might be Dryopteris lepidopoda, or Sunset fern. Have you seen the integrifolia growing up one of the old walnuts at Joy Creek? Half of the tree blew down a few years ago, but the hydrangea is still fabulous.

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