Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Learn from my mistakes #8, sometimes the plant doesn't die…

It’s no secret I’m drawn to plants which are only borderline hardy in my climate. Usually this means I go to whatever lengths necessary to try and keep them alive. However there are the rare exceptions when I decide I’m going to treat a particular plant as an annual. Love it for a season and then let it go. It’s that thinking that got me here…

With this Acacia pravissima rapidly becoming the tree it wants to be, planted a mere 9” from my house, and getting stuck in the rain gutter. People this is not good a gardening practice!

It was supposed to be struck down during the winter of 2011/12 but it powered on and so far it’s taking this (mild) winter in stride. What does the future hold? Well only time will tell, but you can learn from my mistake…sometimes the plant lives!

By the way this plant is also my "favorite plant in the garden this week" if your wondering. I wouldn't want to let you down.

28 comments:

  1. So are you going to move it? That's one way to make sure it dies.

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    1. Funny I thought the same exact thing! So probably not.

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  2. funny, i am growing a pravissima in portland as well-- planted as a dieback shrub. it is also turning into a tree for the first time since i planted it in 2009, completely shading out a lot of plants that are supposed to get full sun.

    is yours about to bloom?

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    1. Oddly no! The one in the shade pavilion greenhouse is covered in buds about to erupt, but this guy doesn't have a single one.

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  3. I love this acacia! Just leave it where it is and prune it judiciously.

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    1. Or wait for the next cold winter?

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  4. so in other words, I should plant an acacia pravissima!! haha I love it!!!! Well it is the year of summer so expect it to take off!

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    1. Yikes...take off like bust through the foundation?

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  5. It's lovely! I think mine will stay in a container...if it revives and if I can find one big enough to sustain it through a few years of growth.

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    1. Would you believe I have one in a container too?

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  6. I had only seen them small, so I was surprised when mine became a tree. Like you, I sited it improperly but I still miss it after it succumbed to the '08 winter. Maybe it's time to start over.

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    1. Yep, I think it is. Same goes for Phormium too!

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  7. It's beautiful just the way it is. Never fear, as soon as you prune it, it's become a fixture of your garden, and you've created all new plantings beneath it that will thrive in the shade it'll cast, we'll get another PKW (works for both phormium and pravissima) and down it will come!

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    1. Exactly...this is what I fear...

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  8. It's really lovely now, I like plants when they are cute and little. Acacias don't really take to being pruned back too much on a regular basis so thats out of the question. You will just have to get another one, and hopefully it will grow just as well. Your garden is looking lovely at this time of year.

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    1. Thank you Karen...perhaps that corner is looking lovely but you should see the rest of it! (or maybe you shouldn't...)

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  9. I'm really enjoying reading your blog, especially the fact that you love a lot of the same plants as me, keep up the good work!

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  10. I think you can keep this low and bushy by regular pruning. Must say well done on keeping alive and doing well!

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    1. Below Karen reports that pruning is a no-no for this plant. I have seen them successfully pruned and offered for sale at a nursery (in an attempt to keep them low and bushy). Do you guys have any first-hand experience?

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  11. On shootgardening.co.uk it states this plant doesn't respond well to regular hard pruning. If by some chance it did like hard pruning it would still outgrow its spot. I would get another one and plant it where it has plenty of room to grow and spread. Good luck with your decision.

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    1. Thank you for doing research Karen! Actually I'm pretty sure there will be another winter that cuts it back. We've just lucked out with two good ones in a row after a string of bad ones. (I speak as if this winter is over when I realize it's not...). If it does become dangerously large before then then I probably will try to prune it a bit, after all what have I got to loose?

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  12. Oh, it's so unique! I'm glad it's survived for you, despite your original intention. Cheers, Jenni

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    1. Unique is the perfect descriptor for this plant!

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  13. Too funny! Nature always outmaneuvers us.

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  14. That is so pretty! I hope you find a way to keep it...

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    1. If not I've got a back up in a container so I won't be without!

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